Why analyzing value gets you results.

It's very common to hear from customers, "What will it cost to build X?" Naturally, I want to understand what X will accomplish. I consider this process understanding the value Y, the desired outcomes. Sometimes customers just demand a cost, but for those that are patient in analyzing the value these are the benefits they will reap:

Optimal solutions

My expertise is custom software development. If I don't know about Y I can't leverage my expertise to propose and build optimal solutions to achieve Y. I also don't have the opportunity to point out deficiencies in X. Imagine someone telling their doctor what medication to prescribe.


If you ask for results, you will likely get them. If you ask for features, there's no guarantee of results.

Significantly less wasted time

If I don't understand Y, when X doesn't accomplish it we'll have to try something else. You would be surprised, but when this happens I usually get requests for changes and new features, again with no guarantee of achieving Y. This has happened on every project I've worked on when Y wasn't discussed. Not only does this waste my time, it wastes yours. We are both stuck with the conundrum of who should pay for this wasted time.

Software development is an involved process, it's not just my time. Success requires your involvement in planning, implementation, user feedback, stakeholder feedback, testing, training and many other aspects. It's easy to overlook/underestimate this time commitment. Either way we both lose if we build failed solutions.

Timely results

If we reduce wasted time, you will get results faster.

Reduced cost

Less wasted time means less cost. Identifying and steering clear of low value projects means more of your money can go to high value projects.


Complexity in software happens naturally, simplicity takes expertise. Simplicity brings a whole host of benefits. If the focus is on features, features (complexity) will be maximized.

Maximum value

If the focus is on value, then value will be maximized! Low value features will take a back seat to higher value features.

Minimized maintenance

In my experience, maintenance cost is exponentially proportional to features. Minimal features means minimal maintenance.

If your business needs to make deliveries you could buy a Lamborghini. However, the cost to maintain it will be much higher than many other equally viable choices.

Flexibility to change

The more features the more difficult it will be to introduce and/or change features in the future. For every feature we must be careful not to "break" it with any updates. Naturally, if we don't minimize features, over time it will become very difficult to introduce change. Ironically, I find the features most likely to get in the way are the ones that aren't even used!

Reduced unused features

Do you want to pay to maintain features you don't use?

If I know Y, when your business changes I can make recommendations about which Xs can be removed. If not, in my experience, they never get removed.

Here's a great post on why less code is better.

Reduced training cost

The more features, the harder it is for users to learn to use your software. Keeping things simple for users means less training. Training cost is proportional, probably exponentially so, to features.

Pivoting on effectiveness

If we both know the desired outcomes we can devise simple methods to monitor the effectiveness of the resulting features at achieving the outcomes. When features prove ineffective we can alter/remove them and try other strategies.

Disciplined investment analysis

If we discuss value we can compare it to cost and make sure we're both making a wise investment decision. Without this analysis it's very easy to propose features that can lead to a marginal or negative ROI. In business it takes extreme discipline to make an investment decision. All too often I see everyone wrapped up in features and value takes a back seat. If we make this our focus, it's less likely to happen and you are more likely to see a significant ROI.

Increased investment capacity

This analysis will naturally take longer the first few times it's done. Over time everyone will become more effective and efficient and the time will be significantly reduced. The capacity to make wise investment decisions in software will be magnified!

Free investment analysis

There's ample opportunity for any company to invest in high value projects. Low value work competes for limited resources to develop high value projects. Low value work is unlikely to make you happy, at least not compared to high value work. If you demonstrate an interest in maximizing value, it means we're much more likely to have a successful business relationship and we're both much more likely to prosper. Because of this I provide this analysis process for free. When we're done you will still make the decision if we move forward. That means before I charge a penny you will already be guaranteed to get something of value!

Identify missing perspectives

When discussing value we're likely to stumble upon roles that usually aren't involved until much later, if at all. These roles often provide perspectives that can avoid sub optimal solutions before we even start. One of these roles is the buyer, the person who sets the final expectations of outcomes. Imagine how difficult it is to achieve an expectation for someone you've never met! Also, users of the resulting software are often left out. For example, if we're trying to save time or expand capacity, doesn't it seem like a good idea to involve the person that does the work now?

It's very easy to identify missing roles when we discuss value and run into questions that can't be answered.

Reduced risk

All of these benefits can be had by simply investing in an analysis of value. Once you get good at this it's often only a few hours investment per project. Is it worth the risk to skip this step?

comments powered by Disqus